Job Advice

Do you have the essential skills for a career in the Manufacturing Industry?

Manufacturing is a diverse industry that offers opportunities to people with a wide range of backgrounds. Whether you’re interested in production, installation, logistics or engineering, it’s important to understand that businesses seek a specific set of skills from potential employees.

We have put together a list of the essential skills that we believe manufacturers are looking for

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1.Attention to Detail

With speed and precision being a high priority in manufacturing, it’s essential for workers to be focused and detail-oriented. When operating heavy machinery, a lack of attention can spell danger for you or your co-workers.

Attention to detail is also critical when it comes to completing work to a high standard, small details can make the difference in measurement and fittings and if these are completed incorrectly it can cause faults and flaws in the end product or service.

2.Critical Thinking

To succeed in the manufacturing industry the individual has to be able to think on their feet and troubleshoot and resolve problems as they arrive.

Workers must be able to use logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions or approaches to difficult situations.

3.Interest and Aptitude for Technology

Technology is constantly evolving and changing the way manufacturing workplaces operate and coordinate. Advances in technology have altered the way manufacturing is operated.

By demonstrating an interest in technology and a strong desire to learn it, you’re sending a message of your long-term potential to employers.

4.Flexibility

Many manufacturing positions now require knowledge of a wide variety of processes and procedures, so an employee who has been, or has the ability to be cross-trained is hugely valuable to a company.

Today, companies look for candidates that have the ability to be cross-trained in numerous functions, as they will be greater assets to the business.

5.STEM Skills

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills play huge roles in Manufacturing; being able to apply the right principles and techniques to the design and production of many goods is essential.

Many people are not fully aware of their math skills. All they know is that they think it’s not always fun. And admittedly, math and science can be acquired tastes. A career in manufacturing can lead you to discover the true value and potential of these skills.

6.Working effectively on a diverse team

Manufacturers need their colleagues to work together towards a common goal.

Being a good teammate is a good step towards becoming a good leader. The type that can disagree without being disagreeable is the people who can succeed in a team environment.

You should also offer problem-solving skills and ideas and be conscious of others ideas.

7.Adaptability

During a time of political and economic change, the ability to adapt to changing work conditions is essential.

Being able to work efficiently during times of increased workloads and pressure, or the ability switch to a different role when required is fundamental as unexpected situations may arise.

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For a confidential discussion about how we can help your business source top manufacturing talent, or if you are eager to develop your career in manufacturing, please get in touch with one of our specialist recruitment consultants who will be happy to help.

Written by Tom Greaves, edited by Jenny Headington

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Risky Business. Don’t Go Back.

Your stomach? Been there, done that. It didn’t work, don’t do it again.

Conscience: “You really shouldn’t be doing this. It didn’t work before, why would it work the second time?”

You: “Well, let’s give it another go. Maybe things will be different this time. We have to make sure that they are. It will all work out fine.”

Cartoon of a man running, a sign resign job

Some of us have experienced this in our personal lives, others may have experienced it in our professional lives – there are even a few poor souls out there who experience this loop over and over again. The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

Just as returning to an ex-partner is often ill-advised, accepting a counter offer from your company after you have resigned is equally bad judgement. It is universally recognised that once you have decided to leave a company, there is no going back. No amount of persuasion, financial incentive or extra management responsibility should be able to persuade you otherwise.

However, it is ever so easy to be lured into the emotional trap. After the last few months of hell in your company, culminating in your resignation, suddenly they are being nice to you again, telling you how essential you are and how they can’t do without you. This is designed to make you think twice, and it plants a seed of doubt in all but the strongest of minds.

exit sign with a cartoon man leaving the place

 

You never knew that they cared about you so much? Well, I’ll let you into a secret - they don’t. Just as a shocked partner might insist that they “really love you” at the point of no return, so might a company do anything to persuade you to stay, at least until they have found a suitable replacement.

89% of people that accept a counter-offer leave within the next year. You have broken the bond of trust and, like a jilted partner, the company will very seldom forgive. Once a trust is broken, it will never be fully restored. Nagging doubts will always linger.

So, when you resign, be resolute in your intentions. Do it in writing. Don’t enter into discussions about a potential rethink. Be consistent in what you tell management and your colleagues. You are moving on; it happens all the time, such is life. Don’t let it get personal, remain professional and make a smooth transition to your next role. You’ll be respected as someone that knows their own mind, and you won’t be burning any bridges.

The decision to leave part of your life behind is never an easy one. Embarking into an unknown future is a far more difficult path than keeping the status quo.

Yes, making a change is risky. However, how much riskier are the consequences of deciding to stay?

Written by Lee Narraway

If you would like to discuss this then please get in touch with me and leave your comments:

Phone: 01925 747 712 Email: lnarraway@procorerec.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/leenarraway Website: www.procorerec.com