Interview Tips

The most asked job interview questions (and how to answer them!)

Need some help preparing for those tricky interview questions? We've listed the most commonly asked questions, with best answers and red flags

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Tell me about yourself

This is a really common question, and is often the first to be asked.

Stick to a work related answer – never go into your personal life unless the interviewer asks you. Give a brief summary of your career history, how your career has developed focusing on your achievements.

Why did you leave your last job?

You should always try and give a positive response to this question, it’s a good idea to highlight that you are now ready for a better opportunity and a new challenge.

However tempting it may be, never ever bad mouth your current employer.

What are your strengths?

This is a question that you should always be prepared for when going into an interview. Be ready to give several examples of your strengths and have instances where you have demonstrated them ready. Don’t list strengths that aren’t relevant to the job you are interviewing for, and don’t be shy about your accomplishments!

What’s your biggest weakness?

We all have weaknesses – recognising them is what’s important.

A good trick for this question is to make sure you highlight how you’ve addressed any issues you’ve faced; perhaps you’ve attended a training course or worked with a mentor.

For example;

“I get quite nervous giving presentations and talking in front of a room of people, so I enrolled on a course to improve my public speaking.”

Don’t mention any faults that would directly affect your ability to do the job.

What do you know about our company?

Make sure you do your homework by browsing every part of the company’s website as that is the most authentic source of information to answer questions like these. If you happen to know someone who already works there ask them for some specific information.

Key points to make a note of are;

  • Industry/sector.

  • Goals.

  • Major competitors.

  • Culture and values.

Why should we hire you?

Make sure you have used the job advert to figure out the employer’s most sought-after skills, and come up with a brief example that explains how you have acquired that skill.

This question should be answered with a sense of bi-party need. Speak in a balanced tone to send the message that company needs you just as much as you want the job. Stay clear of comparing yourself with other applicants though!

How would your co-workers describe you?

You don’t want to merely give a list of adjectives your colleagues would say about you. Instead- focus on one attribute that describes your work ethic, and think of a time when you have demonstrated it in the workplace. When telling a story- it is crucial that you do not just make something up, and don’t be dishonest.

Try to use the STAR method for delivering your answers to questions you are asked:

The beauty of this is it allows you to elaborate in context and it opens the door for further questions about the topic you have chosen to respond with.

It’s a clear, structured and concise method and the best way of minimising the amount of questions that you just "don't know" so here is a recap:

Situation: The position I was in

Task: What I was asked to do while in that situation

Action: What I did after I was asked to do what I was doing in the situation

Result: What end product of the action.

 Written by Jenny Headington

Feed me… Feed me! More Feedback Please

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Feedback, such an insignificant word on the face of it. Yet, it is the biggest element that makes any process improve. This could be an automated process right through to a service process. Without the feed-back to the input of the system there isn't any way to know how and where the improvements can be made.

When I worked in industry the process systems would use the feedback loop in order to change the input of the process. This would automatically make changes to various valve positions in order to control flow, speed changes on pumps to control volumes, and heating systems to dry the paper a little more or less depending on what the feedback loop had found during the process.

This relates to recruitment is a similar way apart from the valves of course!

When a brief is taken for a role, the skilled recruiter would typically send a benchmark CV to the hiring manager to create a gap analysis. This is then fine-tuned in order to improve relevancy. Without the feedback loop in this case, the gap towards the right skill sets will not be closed in a controlled fashion meaning a lot of wasted time for the client in reviewing candidates that do not hit the mark.

The same thing applies to interviews. Feedback is a real must following an interview to gauge how the candidate performed and to also gauge how the client performed. This then allows for changes to how the interview is conducted or how the candidate presents themselves at a future interview. In essence it allows the gaps to be closed and an accurate fit to be sourced.

The real benefits can be numerous, from candidate development right through to improving the interview process and hiring manager’s interview skills, along with the brand of the company. Everybody likes to get the feedback whether it’s good or bad (mainly good of course) as it allows the loop to be closed one way or another.

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I had a candidate who was struggling at interview in terms of illustrating his skills and experiences in a clear and efficient manner. Through learning form the feedback, we are able to introduce him to some techniques to deliver examples in a clear and concise manner. With just some small changes to his approach, he was able to secure a great position at a forward thinking company that provided the opportunities he needed to progress his career to the next level

We also worked with a client in the automotive industry who was receiving a negative image due to the way it treated its employees. By sharing this feedback and educating our client, we were able to open their eyes to some different approaches that allowed them to manage their employees in a more positive and upbeat manner. This resulted in a rapid change in behaviour and a significant increase in the happiness and motivation of the workforce.

In short and it it's simple. Provide feedback in a timely manner and keep it clear and constructive.

Written by Lee Narraway

If you would like to discuss this then please get in touch with me and leave your comments:

Phone: 01925 747 712Email: lnarraway@procorerec.comLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/leenarrawayWebsite: www.procorerec.com