Candidate Tips

Do you have the essential skills for a career in the Manufacturing Industry?

Manufacturing is a diverse industry that offers opportunities to people with a wide range of backgrounds. Whether you’re interested in production, installation, logistics or engineering, it’s important to understand that businesses seek a specific set of skills from potential employees.

We have put together a list of the essential skills that we believe manufacturers are looking for

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1.Attention to Detail

With speed and precision being a high priority in manufacturing, it’s essential for workers to be focused and detail-oriented. When operating heavy machinery, a lack of attention can spell danger for you or your co-workers.

Attention to detail is also critical when it comes to completing work to a high standard, small details can make the difference in measurement and fittings and if these are completed incorrectly it can cause faults and flaws in the end product or service.

2.Critical Thinking

To succeed in the manufacturing industry the individual has to be able to think on their feet and troubleshoot and resolve problems as they arrive.

Workers must be able to use logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions or approaches to difficult situations.

3.Interest and Aptitude for Technology

Technology is constantly evolving and changing the way manufacturing workplaces operate and coordinate. Advances in technology have altered the way manufacturing is operated.

By demonstrating an interest in technology and a strong desire to learn it, you’re sending a message of your long-term potential to employers.

4.Flexibility

Many manufacturing positions now require knowledge of a wide variety of processes and procedures, so an employee who has been, or has the ability to be cross-trained is hugely valuable to a company.

Today, companies look for candidates that have the ability to be cross-trained in numerous functions, as they will be greater assets to the business.

5.STEM Skills

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills play huge roles in Manufacturing; being able to apply the right principles and techniques to the design and production of many goods is essential.

Many people are not fully aware of their math skills. All they know is that they think it’s not always fun. And admittedly, math and science can be acquired tastes. A career in manufacturing can lead you to discover the true value and potential of these skills.

6.Working effectively on a diverse team

Manufacturers need their colleagues to work together towards a common goal.

Being a good teammate is a good step towards becoming a good leader. The type that can disagree without being disagreeable is the people who can succeed in a team environment.

You should also offer problem-solving skills and ideas and be conscious of others ideas.

7.Adaptability

During a time of political and economic change, the ability to adapt to changing work conditions is essential.

Being able to work efficiently during times of increased workloads and pressure, or the ability switch to a different role when required is fundamental as unexpected situations may arise.

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For a confidential discussion about how we can help your business source top manufacturing talent, or if you are eager to develop your career in manufacturing, please get in touch with one of our specialist recruitment consultants who will be happy to help.

Written by Tom Greaves, edited by Jenny Headington

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Top 5 Interview Tips

There isn't any exact science when it comes down to interviewing, but you can stack the percentages in your favour by following these simple tips: job interview candidates

number one

 

Dress well! Now, I don't mean Mickey Mouse Ties (yes, I’ve had one of these) and bright red and green socks I mean a clean, tidy business suit, plain shirt / blouse and a matching tie - follow this simple rule a little bird once told me; 1 plain and 2 stripe or 1 stripe and 2 plain.

 

number two

 

Make sure you prepare well, it’s no surprise that the candidates who prepare the best get the best jobs, it’s a fact and it’s something that there can be no excuse for. The internet has been around long enough to ensure that there is information about the company and sector you're working in, so instead of watching the TV get busy reading and researching.

 

number three

Have plenty of questions written down for the inevitable "do you have any questions" bit. It will happen and you know it will so make sure you’re ready for it. This bit is so easy and you generate the questions from your preparation time. Don’t forget – Interviews are a two way thing. Asking questions you want to know the answer to is the perfect way to get to know the employer and the interviewer! Make sure that you have enough company information so that you feel comfortable, confident and excited going forward!

 

number four

Use the STAR method for delivering your answers to questions you’re asked: Now many of you will have heard of this and it’s a common thing. The beauty of this is it allows you to elaborate in context and it opens the door for further questions about the topic you have chosen to respond with. It’s a clear, structured and concise method and the best way of minimising the amount of questions that you just "don't know" so here is a recap:

  1. Situation: The position I was in
  2. Task: What I was asked to do while in that situation
  3. Action: What I did after I was asked to do what I was doing in the situation
  4. Result: What end product of the action.

number five

DO NOT BE LATE FOR WHATEVER REASON IN THE WORLD APART FROM NUCLEAR DISASTER. If you're going to be late then it would probably best to rearrange the whole thing! A minute here and there I guess isn't going to kill you or the interviewer, but it may be the difference between two equally matched candidates and it’s just not worth the risk!

Written By Lee Narraway and Edited By Natalie Whaley

If you would like to discuss this short article in more detail then please connect with me and let's chat.

Lee Narraway

Phone: 01925 747 712 Email: lnarraway@procorerec.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/leenarraway/ Website: www.procorerec.com/