tips

You Don’t Climb Straight Up The Mountain

If you want to reach heights that few others have reached, you have to realize that the path will not be a linear one. There is no well-worn track to reassure you, and the ghosts of those who have failed dance in your footsteps. You have to be content to take two steps forward, a few steps sideways and one step back to ensure that you have a chance of success.

Man climbing mountain

When momentum stalls, your willpower is the only thing you have left.

Life is not meant to be spent at 100 miles-an-hour, careering from one amazing achievement to the next. It is an adventure, and, to my mind, it is very similar to scaling a mountain (or a series of mountains).

Unless you have a Yoda-like mentor, very few of us can be certain what is around the next corner. If it is a deep crevasse, the choice is to risk the jump over or walk to where it gets thinner? If bad weather is forecast, do you abandon the climb until it has blown itself out? Do you stop at the third camp for the night, even though the summit is tantalisingly in reach?

On a climbing expedition, you have to balance the risks and the rewards. Sometimes, the going will be easy, and the decisions will be clear. At other times, you will be tearing your hair out with frustration.

After a successful career in Engineering, many of my friends were surprised when I went into recruitment. I have always enjoyed the “people” aspects in my roles, and deep down, it felt right if not a little scary. When you start a new transition, it is almost like coming around that mountain pass, only to see a yet higher peak ahead of you. Daunting, but exhilarating.

Heading up the engineering division of Procore Solutions is the best thing that I have done in my career. It took a leap of faith, and yes, that faith is still tested daily, but I am still climbing. I am not sure that I will ever get to the “summit” – it would be boring to imagine that this is even possible. For me, the climb is the enjoyment.

man mountain

So many people are now making transitions to new careers, using their transferable skills to scale new heights. 20 years ago, this would have been unthinkable, but in the dynamic new world of work, it seems to me that breadth of experience is more valuable than depth of experience. No one trudges along the same boring career path for 30 years anymore. There are mountains to explore, and sometimes it makes sense to go backwards if you want to go forwards.

If you view every step of your journey as a step closer to your destination, then every step is valuable. Every mistake, every wrong turn, they are all part of your way to the top.

You don’t climb straight up the mountain. Simply make sure that you keep climbing, and you will get there!

Written by Lee Narraway edited by Paul Drury 

If you would like to discuss this then please get in touch with me and leave your comments:

Lee Narraway

Phone: 01925747712 Email: lnarraway@procorerec.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/leenarraway Website: www.procorerec.com

How to successfully ask for a raise

Asking your boss for more money isn’t always an easy conversation. And unless there is a well-structured review system in place, it’s likely that you’ll need to proactively broach this topic. It can be a tricky topic to discuss so to help you successfully ask for a pay rise; here are our top tips for preparing yourself for the conversation. man throwing money

 

Research the market

While it’s not advisable to openly discuss salaries with your colleagues, arming yourself with as much information about what others in your position earn is the best place to start.

Instead of prying into your co-worker’s earnings, look on comparison websites and job boards to get an idea of the market salary for your industry and experience level. This will help you decide on a number before speaking with your manager – you need to be specific about what you want.

Build your case

Think about why you’re asking for a raise. Have you recently had some big successes in your current job? Do you believe you’ve taken on some new responsibilities? Perhaps you’ve consistently delivered exceptional work since accepting the job.

Whatever your reasons, it’s important that you build your case by providing clear evidence as to why you deserve a raise.

Prepare specific examples and provide solid reasoning to prove that you deserve more of the business’ profits. Wherever possible, tie your successes to business results – increase in sales, solutions that save money, etc. Adding a monetary value to your success can provide irrefutable evidence.

Find the right time

Be strategic about when you speak with your manager – avoid catching them when they are busy, against a tight deadline or about to pack up for the day. Try and find a time when they will be able to give their full attention and really focus on the conversation.

If you can, set up a meeting in advance to ensure you manager will be available. This also gives you time to prepare your case!

Get to the point

When you finally do find the right time and have your manager’s attention it’s critical that you get to the point without going off topic or beating around the bush.

A couple of ways you can kick off the conversation include: ‘I’d like to talk about reviewing my pay’, or ‘In light of my performance at work, I wanted to ask you about a pay raise’.

Give your manager a chance to respond, and then tell them the amount you’re looking for – this is your opportunity to present your case and back up your request.

Focus on business

A raise might help you save up for a house, or buy a new car, but try not to discuss these during the meeting. Your personal reasons for wanting a raise are completely irrelevant.

Keep the conversation focused on your contribution to the business and why that warrants a higher reward than your current salary.

Control your nerves

If your manager isn’t entirely warm to the idea it’s likely that a negotiation will come to life – negotiations around money can often be tense so it’s important to keep your nerves in control.

Don’t back down under pressure, never take back your request, or suggest a lower amount. Stay calm and wait for your manager to respond to your initial request.

Whatever you do, do not leave the meeting without knowing the next step. If your manager says they cannot talk to you at this time, or they’re not the best person for you to be having the conversation with, ask them directly what the next step will be and when you can expect this to happen.

About the guest author: 

Laura Slingo is Digital Copywriter for the UK’s leading independent job board, CV-Library. For more expert advice on job searches, careers and the workplace, visit their Career Advice pages.

Please leave your comments.