career

Feed me… Feed me! More Feedback Please

interview

interview

Feedback, such an insignificant word on the face of it. Yet, it is the biggest element that makes any process improve. This could be an automated process right through to a service process. Without the feed-back to the input of the system there isn't any way to know how and where the improvements can be made.

When I worked in industry the process systems would use the feedback loop in order to change the input of the process. This would automatically make changes to various valve positions in order to control flow, speed changes on pumps to control volumes, and heating systems to dry the paper a little more or less depending on what the feedback loop had found during the process.

This relates to recruitment is a similar way apart from the valves of course!

When a brief is taken for a role, the skilled recruiter would typically send a benchmark CV to the hiring manager to create a gap analysis. This is then fine-tuned in order to improve relevancy. Without the feedback loop in this case, the gap towards the right skill sets will not be closed in a controlled fashion meaning a lot of wasted time for the client in reviewing candidates that do not hit the mark.

The same thing applies to interviews. Feedback is a real must following an interview to gauge how the candidate performed and to also gauge how the client performed. This then allows for changes to how the interview is conducted or how the candidate presents themselves at a future interview. In essence it allows the gaps to be closed and an accurate fit to be sourced.

The real benefits can be numerous, from candidate development right through to improving the interview process and hiring manager’s interview skills, along with the brand of the company. Everybody likes to get the feedback whether it’s good or bad (mainly good of course) as it allows the loop to be closed one way or another.

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I had a candidate who was struggling at interview in terms of illustrating his skills and experiences in a clear and efficient manner. Through learning form the feedback, we are able to introduce him to some techniques to deliver examples in a clear and concise manner. With just some small changes to his approach, he was able to secure a great position at a forward thinking company that provided the opportunities he needed to progress his career to the next level

We also worked with a client in the automotive industry who was receiving a negative image due to the way it treated its employees. By sharing this feedback and educating our client, we were able to open their eyes to some different approaches that allowed them to manage their employees in a more positive and upbeat manner. This resulted in a rapid change in behaviour and a significant increase in the happiness and motivation of the workforce.

In short and it it's simple. Provide feedback in a timely manner and keep it clear and constructive.

Written by Lee Narraway

If you would like to discuss this then please get in touch with me and leave your comments:

Phone: 01925 747 712Email: lnarraway@procorerec.comLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/leenarrawayWebsite: www.procorerec.com

Risky Business. Don’t Go Back.

Your stomach? Been there, done that. It didn’t work, don’t do it again.

Conscience: “You really shouldn’t be doing this. It didn’t work before, why would it work the second time?”

You: “Well, let’s give it another go. Maybe things will be different this time. We have to make sure that they are. It will all work out fine.”

Cartoon of a man running, a sign resign job

Some of us have experienced this in our personal lives, others may have experienced it in our professional lives – there are even a few poor souls out there who experience this loop over and over again. The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

Just as returning to an ex-partner is often ill-advised, accepting a counter offer from your company after you have resigned is equally bad judgement. It is universally recognised that once you have decided to leave a company, there is no going back. No amount of persuasion, financial incentive or extra management responsibility should be able to persuade you otherwise.

However, it is ever so easy to be lured into the emotional trap. After the last few months of hell in your company, culminating in your resignation, suddenly they are being nice to you again, telling you how essential you are and how they can’t do without you. This is designed to make you think twice, and it plants a seed of doubt in all but the strongest of minds.

exit sign with a cartoon man leaving the place

 

You never knew that they cared about you so much? Well, I’ll let you into a secret - they don’t. Just as a shocked partner might insist that they “really love you” at the point of no return, so might a company do anything to persuade you to stay, at least until they have found a suitable replacement.

89% of people that accept a counter-offer leave within the next year. You have broken the bond of trust and, like a jilted partner, the company will very seldom forgive. Once a trust is broken, it will never be fully restored. Nagging doubts will always linger.

So, when you resign, be resolute in your intentions. Do it in writing. Don’t enter into discussions about a potential rethink. Be consistent in what you tell management and your colleagues. You are moving on; it happens all the time, such is life. Don’t let it get personal, remain professional and make a smooth transition to your next role. You’ll be respected as someone that knows their own mind, and you won’t be burning any bridges.

The decision to leave part of your life behind is never an easy one. Embarking into an unknown future is a far more difficult path than keeping the status quo.

Yes, making a change is risky. However, how much riskier are the consequences of deciding to stay?

Written by Lee Narraway

If you would like to discuss this then please get in touch with me and leave your comments:

Phone: 01925 747 712 Email: lnarraway@procorerec.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/leenarraway Website: www.procorerec.com